U.S. July Jobless Rates Up over the Year in All 389 Metro Areas

Jobless rates were higher in July than a year earlier in all 389 metropolitan areas. Nonfarm payroll employment was down in 272 metropolitan areas, up in 1, and essentially unchanged in 116.

METROPOLITAN AREA EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT — JULY 2020

Unemployment rates were higher in July than a year earlier in all 389 metropolitan areas, the
U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. A total of seven areas had jobless rates of
less than 5.0 percent and four areas had rates of at least 20.0 percent. Nonfarm payroll
employment decreased over the year in 272 metropolitan areas, increased in 1 area, and was
essentially unchanged in 116 areas. The national unemployment rate in July was 10.5 percent,
not seasonally adjusted, up from 4.0 percent a year earlier.

This news release presents statistics from two monthly programs. The civilian labor force
and unemployment data are based on the same concepts and definitions as those used for the
national household survey estimates. These data pertain to individuals by where they reside.
The employment data are from an establishment survey that measures nonfarm employment,
hours, and earnings by industry. These data pertain to jobs on payrolls defined by where the
establishments are located. For more information about the concepts and statistical
methodologies used by these two programs, see the Technical Note.

Metropolitan Area Unemployment (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

El Centro, CA, had the highest unemployment rate in July, 26.8 percent, followed by Yuma,
AZ, 24.8 percent, and Atlantic City-Hammonton, NJ, 24.0 percent. Logan, UT-ID, and Idaho
Falls, ID, had the lowest unemployment rates, 2.7 percent and 3.1 percent, respectively. A
total of 268 areas had July jobless rates below the U.S. rate of 10.5 percent, 116 areas
had rates above it, and 5 areas had rates equal to that of the nation. (See table 1.)

The largest over-the-year unemployment rate increases in July occurred in Atlantic City-
Hammonton, NJ (+19.0 percentage points), and Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, HI (+18.7 points).
Rates rose over the year by at least 10.0 percentage points in an additional 15 areas. The
smallest jobless rate increase from a year earlier occurred in Logan, UT-ID (+0.3 percentage
point).

Of the 51 metropolitan areas with a 2010 Census population of 1 million or more, Los
Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA, had the highest unemployment rate in July, 16.8 percent,
followed by Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, NV, and New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA,
16.4 percent each. Salt Lake City, UT, had the lowest jobless rate among the large areas,
5.3 percent. All 51 large areas had over-the-year unemployment rate increases, the largest
of which were in Boston-Cambridge-Nashua, MA-NH (+12.6 percentage points), New York-Newark-
Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA (+12.4 points), and Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA (+12.3 points).
The smallest rate increase occurred in Louisville/Jefferson County, KY-IN (+2.0 percentage
points).

Metropolitan Division Unemployment (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

Eleven of the most populous metropolitan areas are made up of 38 metropolitan divisions,
which are essentially separately identifiable employment centers. In July, Lawrence-Methuen
Town-Salem, MA-NH, had the highest unemployment rate among the divisions, 21.4 percent.
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, MD, had the lowest division rate, 7.3 percent. (See
table 2.)

In July, all 38 metropolitan divisions had over-the-year unemployment rate increases, the
largest of which was in Lawrence-Methuen Town-Salem, MA-NH (+17.3 percentage points). The
smallest rate increase occurred in Dallas-Plano-Irving, TX (+3.8 percentage points).

Metropolitan Area Nonfarm Employment (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

In July, 272 metropolitan areas had over-the-year decreases in nonfarm payroll employment,
1 had an increase, and 116 were essentially unchanged. The largest over-the-year employment
decreases occurred in New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA (-1,354,700), Los Angeles-Long
Beach-Anaheim, CA (-628,000), and Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI (-396,000). The
largest over-the-year percentage losses in employment occurred in Ocean City, NJ (-29.7
percent), Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, HI (-27.6 percent), and Atlantic City-Hammonton, NJ, and
Barnstable Town, MA (-19.9 percent each). Employment increased in Idaho Falls, ID (+4,000,
or +5.6 percent). (See table 3.)

Over the year, nonfarm employment declined in all of the 51 metropolitan areas with a 2010
Census population of 1 million or more. The largest over-the-year percentage decreases in
employment in these large metropolitan areas occurred in New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-
PA (-13.6 percent), Rochester, NY (-13.0 percent), and Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, NV
(-12.6 percent).

Metropolitan Division Nonfarm Employment (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

In July, nonfarm payroll employment decreased in all of the 38 metropolitan divisions over
the year. The largest over-the-year decrease in employment among the metropolitan divisions
occurred in New York-Jersey City-White Plains, NY-NJ (-1,026,700), followed by Los Angeles-
Long Beach-Glendale, CA (-424,900), and Chicago-Naperville-Arlington Heights, IL (-311,900).
(See table 4.)

The largest over-the-year percentage decreases in employment occurred in Lynn-Saugus-
Marblehead, MA (-16.2 percent), Haverhill-Newburyport-Amesbury Town, MA-NH (-14.8 percent),
and New York-Jersey City-White Plains, NY-NJ (-14.2 percent).